“‘Is Real Name” – One Year Bible Reading – January 17

Old Testament:   Genesis 35:1-36:43

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Genesis 35:1-36:43  ‘Is Real Name

Summary:   Jacob is told by God to move to Bethel aka “house of God.”  Yahweh reminds Jacob that his new name is “Israel” which means “prevails with God.”  He will be the source of a great nation.

Rachel dies giving birth to her Jacob’s final and twelfth son, Benjamin.  Benjamin means, “son of my right hand.”  Isaac dies at age 180.

Jacob’s twelve sons are listed and Esau’s descendants are named.  Jacob and Esau because they had both become so prosperous that Esau had to move to Canaan.

 

In Chapter 35Jacob is told by God to move to Bethel which means, “house of God” (v. 1).  Jacob told his family to put away all their idols (v. 2).  Jacob is reminded that his name is now “Israel” which means “prevails with God.”  He is told he will be the source of a great nation (vv. 9-12).

Rachel dies giving birth to her Jacob’s final and twelfth son, Benjamin.  Benjamin means, “son of my right hand” (vv. 16-18).

Reuben, Jacob’s first born, had “relations” with Jacob’s concubine, Bilhah, and all of the rest of the family heard about it (v. 22a, b).  He forfeited his inheritance (cf. Gen. 49:3-4).

Isaac dies at age 180 (v. 28).

Jacob’s twelve sons and their mothers are enumerated (vv. 22c-26).

In Chapter 36, Esau’s descendants are named including kings in the land before the nation of Israel had kings (vv. 1-30; 31-42).

There wasn’t enough land to support both Jacob and Esau because they had both become so prosperous so Esau moved to Canaan (vv. 7-8).  Seir is also known as Edom (v. 8).  The area of Edom is southern Israel but leaks a little east and west into modern-day Jordan and Egypt.

Edom and Esau are the same thing, just as Sier and Edom at the same thing, so whenever you read Edom, you can think of Esau (v.1, 8).  Esau means “red” (cf. Gen. 25:30) and Edom also means “red.”

New Testament:  Matthew 12:1-21

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Summary:

The religious leaders, who are under conviction by Jesus’ ministry, try to find fault with him.   They accuse the disciples of breaking the Sabbath laws but Jesus points out that He, Himself, is the Lord of the Sabbath and can determine the ethics of his own disciples.  His major point was that the religious leaders were legalists and missing the point of His ministry.

To reinforce His point, Jesus then healed a man with a withered hand on the Sabbath.  Jesus had them on the horns of a dilemma.  He asked if they’d pull one of their rams out of a ditch on the Sabbath.    They begin to plot His death.

Jesus quotes Isaiah 42:1-4.  The prophecy indicates due to the Jews’ rejection, He will begin to work more with non-Jews (Gentiles).

Matthew 12: 1 – 21   Picking On Jesus

The disciples pick grain and the religious leaders are picking on Jesus again.  They say the disciples are breaking the Sabbath laws  since they were reaping by picking the wheat, threshing by rubbing the wheat heads in their palms, and winnowing by blowing the chaff away. (Wow.) Jesus points out that David ate bread out of the temple (“consecrated bread,” 1 Sam. 21:1-6) and the priests, themselves, work on the Sabbath in the temple.  Furthermore, Jesus is Himself the Lord of the Sabbath and He can let his disciples do what . . . ever.  His major point was that the religious leaders were being externalists rather than looking internally at the heart (vv. 1-7).

To add insult to injury, Jesus heals a man with a withered hand on the Sabbath.  Of course, the religious leaders test Him again, asking if it’s OK to heal on a Saturday (Sabbath).  Jesus replies that any of them would pull their lambs out of a ditch if they had to on a Saturday.  Then He heals the guy.  That really torques the religious leaders so they plan how to remove Him from the earth (vv. 8-21).  Jesus said what was needed to understand what God meant when He said, “I desire compassion and not a sacrifice” (cf. v. 7, quoting Hos. 6:6).  The religious leaders were more concerned with keeping the law than they were about human beings.

Jesus then cites Isaiah 42:1-4 (vv. 18-21).  No matter how much the leaders try to rattle Jesus, He will still be compassionate.  But the prophecy also indicates that due to the Jews’ rejection, He will begin to work more with non-Jews (Gentiles, cf. “to the nations,” v. 18b, 21).

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